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Preview: Brookings Blum Roundtable on Global Poverty

Brookings Series - Brookings Blum Roundtable on Global Poverty



Brookings Series - Brookings Blum Roundtable on Global Poverty



Published: Thu, 28 Jul 2016 07:44:59 -0400

Last Build Date: Wed, 05 Aug 2015 09:00:00 -0400

 



2015 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Disrupting development with digital technologies

Wed, 05 Aug 2015 09:00:00 -0400

Event Information August 5-7, 2015Aspen, Colorado The emergence of a new digital economy is changing the ways in which businesses and development organizations engage in emerging and developing countries. Transaction costs have been radically driven down, enabling greater inclusion. And technology is driving efficiency improvements, and permitting rapid scaling-up and transformational change. On August 5-7, 2015, Brookings Global Economy and Development is hosting the twelfth annual Brookings Blum Roundtable on Global Poverty in Aspen, Colorado. This year’s roundtable theme, “Disrupting development with digital technologies,” brings together global leaders, entrepreneurs, practitioners, and public intellectuals to discuss three trends in particular have the potential to redefine how global development occurs and how efforts will support it over the next 10 years: (1) the growing adoption of digital payments serving people everywhere with near-frictionless transactions; (2) the spread of internet connectivity and digital literacy; and (3) the harnessing of data to better serve the poor and to generate new knowledge. This event is closed, but you can follow along on Twitter using #Blum2015. Roundtable Agenda Wednesday, August 5, 2015 Welcome and opening remarks - 8:40-9:00 a.m.: Richard C. Blum, Blum Capital Partners Mike Kubzansky, Omidyar Network Kemal Derviş, Brookings Institution Session I - 9:00-10:30 a.m.: Realizing the potential of the digital economy The digital revolution presents profound opportunities for global development. By integrating poor people into digital networks, the revolution can redefine what it means to be poor, and forge new pathways to prosperity for both individuals and countries. What are the challenges in making the digital revolution fully inclusive and scalable—and how can they be lifted? In a full-fledged digital economy, which constraints facing the poor will diminish and which will remain? What risks does the digital economy pose? Moderator: Kemal Derviş, Brookings Institution Introductory remarks: Michael Faye, GiveDirectly, Segovia Technology Tunde Kehinde, African Courier Express Christina Sass, Andela Tariq Malik, National Database and Registration Authority Session II - 10:50 - 12:20 p.m.: Global money Between 2011 and 2014, 700 million people started a bank account for the first time, representing a giant step toward the World Bank goal of universal financial inclusion by 2020. Meanwhile, the digitalization of payments, spurred in part by 255 mobile money services across the developing world, is pushing the cost of basic financial transactions down toward zero. How will an era of global money transform formal and informal business? Which sectors, product markets, and government services have the most to gain and lose from increased market efficiency? What are the consequences for financial regulation? Moderator: Henrietta Fore, Holsman International Introductory remarks: Ruth Goodwin-Groen, Better than Cash Alliance Luis Buenaventura, Rebit.ph, Satoshi Citadel Industries Tayo Oviosu, Paga Loretta Michaels, U.S. Department of the Treasury Lunch - 12:30-2:00 p.m. Cocktail reception and interview - 5:00-7:00 p.m.: During the reception, Richard Blum will lead a short discussion with Walter Isaacson and Ann Mei Chang on the topic “Silicon Valley and Innovation for the Developing World,” followed by questions. Remarks begin at 5:30 and will end at 6:15 p.m. Thursday, August 6, 2015 Session III - 9:00-10:30 a.m.: Global connections Numerous ventures are competing today to bring internet connectivity to the furthest corners of the planet, while low-cost, user-centered-designed platforms are expanding[...]



2014 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Jump-Starting Inclusive Growth in the Most Difficult Environments

Thu, 07 Aug 2014 09:00:00 -0400

Event Information August 7-9, 2014Aspen, Colorado The start of the 21st century has been an auspicious period for global economic development. In the 1990s, a mere 13 emerging economies succeeded in growing at a speed at least twice that of the OECD countries, enabling rapid convergence on Western living standards. By the first decade of the 2000s, this number had mushroomed to 83. Accelerated rates of economic growth lay behind many of the recent success stories in global development, not least the fulfilment of the first Millennium Development Goal to halve the global poverty rate, five years ahead of the 2015 deadline. Yet in a number of places, growth has failed to take off, has undergone periodic reversals, or has benefited a few while leaving the majority short-changed. On August 7-9, 2014, Brookings Global Economy and Development is hosting the eleventh annual Brookings Blum Roundtable on Global Poverty in Aspen, Colorado. This year’s roundtable theme, “Jump-Starting Inclusive Growth in the Most Difficult Environment,” brings together global leaders, entrepreneurs, practitioners, and public intellectuals to discuss what strategies exist for promoting inclusive economic growth in settings where standard prescriptions are not feasible or sufficient as well as what the comparative advantages are of different actors seeking to improve the prospects for inclusive growth and how can they most effectively collaborate with each other to increase their impact.  This event is closed, but you can follow along on Twitter using #Blum2014. Roundtable Agenda Thursday, August 7, 2014 Welcome - 3:30-4:00 p.m.: Strobe Talbott, Brookings Institution Opening Remarks: Richard C. Blum, Blum Capital Partners Pamela Smith, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Kemal Derviş, Brookings Institution Session I - 4:00-5:00 p.m.: How Can Multinationals Engage With Governments to Support Economic Development? Multinational corporations are increasingly recognized as key partners for governments in development planning. Corporations are brought into discussions at various levels: around individual projects and their impact on affected localities; on sector performance, regulation and competition; and on country-level issues such as the business environment, infrastructure, jobs, and skills. What motivations do multinationals have to participate in government engagement? Do discussions work better under formalized and multilateral structures, such as business councils, or on an ad-hoc bilateral basis? How does engagement differ in poor and weakly governed countries?     Moderator: Laura Tyson, University of California, Berkeley Introductory Remarks: Jane Nelson, Harvard University Tara Nathan, MasterCard Worldwide The Honorable Amara Konneh, Government of Liberia Aspen Institute Madeleine K. Albright Global Development Dinner & Lecture - 7:00-9:30 p.m.: The Aspen Institute Madeleine K. Albright Global Development Lecture recognizes an exceptional individual whose vision has provided breakthrough thinking to tackle the challenges of global development. Featuring:  The Honorable Helen Clark, Administrator, United Nations Development Program  Friday, August 8, 2014 Session II - 9:00 - 10:30 a.m.: Managing Risks in Conflict Settings Ending extreme poverty over the next generation will require inclusive and sustained growth across the developing world. This is a particularly onerous challenge in fragile and conflict-affected states, which account for a growing share of the world’s poor. There is growing recognition that fast economic recovery, and the jobs that go with[...]



2013 Brookings Blum Roundtable: The Private Sector in the New Global Development Agenda

Sun, 04 Aug 2013 08:00:00 -0400

Event Information August 4-6, 2013Aspen, Colorado Lifting an estimated 1.2 billion people from extreme poverty over the next generation will require robust and broadly-shared economic growth throughout the developing world that is sufficient to generate decent jobs for an ever-expanding global labor force. Innovative but affordable solutions must also be found to meet people’s demand for basic needs like food, housing, a quality education and access to energy resources. And major investments will still be required to effectively address global development challenges, such as climate change and child and maternal health.  On all these fronts, the private sector, from small- and medium-sized enterprises to major global corporations, must play a significant and expanded role. On August 4-6, 2013, Brookings Global Economy and Development is hosting the tenth annual Brookings Blum Roundtable on Global Poverty in Aspen, Colorado. This year’s roundtable theme, “The Private Sector in the New Global Development Agenda,” brings together global leaders, entrepreneurs, practitioners and public intellectuals to discuss how the contribution of the private sector be enhanced in the push to end poverty over the next generation and how government work more effectively with the private sector to leverage its investments in developing countries.  Tweets about "#Blum2013" Roundtable Agenda Sunday, August 4, 2013 Welcome: 8:40AM - 9:00AM MST Brookings Welcome • Strobe Talbott, Brookings Opening Remarks • Richard C. Blum, Blum Capital Partners, LP and Founder of  the Blum Center for Developing Economies at UC Berkeley • Julie Sunderland, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation • Kemal Derviş, Global Economy and Development, Brookings Session I: 9:00AM - 10:30AM MST Framing Session: Reimagining the Role of the Private Sector In this opening discussion, participants will explore the overarching questions for the roundtable: How can the contribution of the private sector be enhanced in the push to end poverty over the next generation? What are the most effective mechanisms for strengthening private sector accountability? How can business practices and norms be encouraged that support sustainable development and job creation? How can business build trust in its contributions to sustainable development? Moderator • Nancy Birdsall, Center for Global Development Introductory Remarks • Homi Kharas, Brookings Institution • Viswanathan Shankar, Standard Chartered Bank • Shannon May, Bridge International Academies Session II: 10:50AM - 12:20PM MST Private Equity Participants will explore the following questions for the roundtable: What are the constraints to higher levels of private equity in the developing world, including in non-traditional sectors? How can early-stage investments be promoted to improve deal flow? How can transaction costs and technical assistance costs be lowered? Moderator • Laura Tyson, University of California, Berkeley Introductory Remarks • Robert van Zwieten, Emerging Markets Private Equity Association • Runa Alam, Development Partners International • Vineet Rai, Aavishkaar Dinner Program: 6:45PM - 9:15PM MST Aspen Institute Madeleine K. Albright Global Development Lecture Featuring • Dr. Paul Farmer, Chief Strategist and Co-Founder, Partners in Health Monday, August 5, 2013 Session III: 9:00AM - 10:30AM MST Goods, Services and Jobs for the Poor Participants will explore the following questions for the roundtable: In what areas are the most promising emerging business models that serve the poor arising? What are the major obstacles in creating and selling profitable, quality, and beneficial products to the poor and how can they be overcome? What common features distinguish successful and replicable solutions? Moderator • Mary Robinson, Mary Robinson[...]



2012 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Innovation and Technology for Development

Wed, 01 Aug 2012 08:40:00 -0400

Event Information August 1-3, 2012Aspen, Colorado On August 1-3, 2012, Brookings Global Economy and Development hosted the ninth annual Brookings Blum Roundtable on Global Poverty in Aspen, Colorado. The year’s roundtable theme, "Innovation and Technology for Development", brought together global leaders, entrepreneurs and practioners to discuss how technology and innovation can be seized to help solve some of the world's most pressing global development challenges. 2012 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Related Materials Read the roundtable report - Clicks into Bricks, Technology into Transformation, and the Fight Against Poverty »  View videos from roundtable participants »  Download the participant list » (PDF)  Download the scene setter » (PDF)  Download the full roundtable agenda » (PDF)   Global development challenges are of massive scale: 61 million children out of school and many more failing to learn basic literacy and numeracy skills; 850 million facing hunger; 1 billion living in slums and 1.3 billion without access to electricity. Yet remarkably little is understood about successful strategies for designing scalable solutions, the impediments to reaching scale, or the most appropriate pathways for getting there. However, a batch of new technologies offers the promise of a breakthrough by encouraging innovative business models, pushing down transaction costs and disintermediating complex activities. Mobile money could realistically reach over 1 billion poor people in the next decade and directly connect millions of rich individuals with millions of poor people. Real-time data can allow resources to be better targeted and managed. New media can sharpen accountability and reduce waste and overlap. height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/yE-jFQnu5Jg" frameborder="0" width="560">   Roundtable Agenda Wednesday, August 1, 2012 Welcome: 8:40AM - 9:00AM Brookings Welcome • Strobe Talbott, Brookings Opening Remarks • Richard C. Blum, Blum Capital Partners, LP and Founder of the Blum Center for Developing Economies at Berkeley • Mark Suzman, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation • Kemal Derviş, Global Economy and Development, Brookings Session I: 9:00AM - 10:30AM Framing Session: Translating Technological Innovations into Transformational Impact In this opening discussion, participants will explore the overarching questions for the roundtable: If the poor can readily be identified and if they have access to financial services and participate in technology-driven communication networks, how does this change the development paradigm? How can effective partnerships be forged to combine the efforts of different international and local actors (businesses, governments, foundations, NGOs, and universities) in propagating solutions? Can scalable technologies raise the profile and potential of new business models, approaches and partnerships? Moderator • Homi Kharas, Brookings Introductory Remarks • Thomas A. Kalil, White House Office of Science and Technology • Michael Kubzansky, Monitor Group  • Lalitesh Katragadda, Google India • Smita Singh, Independent Session II: 10:50AM - 12:20PM Mobile Money and Mass Payments Participants will explore the following questions for the rountable: Is the rapid uptake of mobile money/payment technology throughout the developing world assured and if not, what (or whom) are the impediments? What is required to enable successful mass payments systems that employ mobile money technology? What is the optimal role of government, non-profits and private actors in supporting [...]



2011 Brookings Blum Roundtable: From Aid to Global Development Cooperation

Wed, 03 Aug 2011 08:00:00 -0400

Event Information August 3-5, 2011Aspen, Colorado Register for the EventThe context for aid is changing. Globalization has spurred economic convergence, upending the twentieth century economic balance and creating a smaller world where both problems and solutions spill across national borders more readily. This has given rise to a legion of new development actors, including emerging economies, NGOs, private businesses, and coordinating networks, who have brought fresh energy and resources to the field while rendering the prospect of genuine donor coordination ever more difficult. Global integration and competition for resources has raised the prominence of global public goods, whose equitable and sustainable provision requires international collective action. Meanwhile, poor countries are demanding a new form of partnership with the international community, built upon the principles of country ownership and mutual accountability. 2011 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Related Materials Read the roundtable report - Global Development Under Pressure »  Read the conference policy briefs »  Download the participant list » (PDF) Download the scene setter » (PDF) Download the full roundtable agenda » (PDF) From G-20 meetings and the upcoming High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness in Korea to unfolding events in the Middle East and North Africa, leadership from the United States is crucial, placing pressure on the Obama administration to deliver on its promise of far-reaching reforms to U.S. global development efforts. And amidst this shifting global landscape is the issue of effectively communicating the importance of global development cooperation to both a national and global public, at a time when budget pressures are being felt across many of the world’s major economies At the eighth annual Brookings Blum Roundtable, co-chaired by Kemal Derviş and Richard C. Blum, 50 thought-leaders in international development came together to discuss a new role for global development cooperation, one that employs inclusive and innovative approaches for tackling contemporary development problems and that leverages the resources of a large field of actors. Roundtable Agenda Wednesday, August 3, 2011 Welcome: 8:40 a.m. – 9:00 a.m. Open Remarks • Richard C. Blum, Blum Capital Partners, LP and Founder of the Blum Center for  Developing Economies at Berkeley • Mark Suzman, Global Development Program, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation • Kemal Derviş, Global Economy and Development, Brookings Statement of Purpose, Scene Setter, Comments on the Agenda • Homi Kharas, Brookings Session I: 9:00AM - 10:30AM Reframing Development Cooperation In almost any discussion of international development, foreign aid takes center stage. But while  aid can certainly be a catalyst for development, it does not work in isolation. Participants will  discuss the key objectives of development cooperation, consider what measures of development  cooperation are most valuable for recipients, and explore an effective balance of roles and  responsibilities - including both public and private players - in today’s evolving development  landscape. Moderator • Walter Isaacson, Aspen Institute Introductory Remarks • Owen Barder, Center for Global Development • Donald Kaberuka, African Development Bank Group • Ananya Roy, University of California, Berkeley • Elizabeth Littlefield, Overseas Private Investment Corporation Session II: 10:50AM - 12:20PM The G-20's Development Agenda Last year&rsq[...]



2010 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Development Assistance Reform for the 21st Century

Wed, 04 Aug 2010 08:00:00 -0400

Event Information August 4-6, 2010 From high-profile stabilization contexts like Afghanistan to global public health campaigns to a renewed focus on sustainable food security and the looming impacts of climate change, development effectiveness is a central and hotly debated issue. As traditional donors make progress in the international aid effectiveness dialogue, they must increasingly take into account the changing global development landscape and the slew of new actors, including emerging donors, multinational corporations, mega philanthropists, high-profile advocates, and a vocal and energized global public. 2010 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Related Materials Read the roundtable report - Aiding Development: Assistance Reform in the 21st Century »  Read the conference policy briefs »  Download the participant list » (PDF) Download the scene setter » (PDF) Download the full roundtable agenda » (PDF) The seventh annual Brookings Blum Roundtable, led by Kemal Derviş and co-chaired by Richard C. Blum and Strobe Talbott, convened over 40 exceptional international thought leaders, entrepreneurs and practitioners to explore the relationship between efforts to promote aid effectiveness and the anticipated shape of the global development agenda over the next decade. The roundtable discussions provided an opportunity to look beyond questions of increased resources for anti-poverty services to the effectiveness of different approaches and to systemic issues associated with the delivery of development outcomes. The high-level group of participants explored opportunities for new commitment in engaging the private sector and multilateral actors, as well as the increasingly important role of climate assistance and operations in instable arenas. Over separate meal conversations, Dr. Donald Kaberuka, president of the African Development Bank, and Dr. Rajiv Shah, administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), reflected on the current and future roles of their organizations, and how they could each act on the suggestions put forward at the roundtable.          [...]



2009 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Climate Crisis, Credit Crisis - Overcoming Obstacles to Build a Climate Resilient World

Thu, 30 Jul 2009 08:00:00 -0400

Event Information July 30 - August 1, 2009 In the midst of a global economic downturn, the world’s climate change negotiators will descend on Copenhagen in December to craft a post-2012 climate regime. But with the timing and impacts of climate change still uncertain—not to mention the ongoing transitions brought about by globalization and the increased cost of capital investment due to weak financial markets—tensions across countries are evident. Policy-makers must now think creatively to realize their goal of revitalizing the global economy through low carbon growth models. 2009 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Related Materials Read the roundtable report - Climate Crisis, Credit Crisis: The Quest for Green Growth »  Read the conference policy briefs »  Download the participant list » (PDF) Download the scene setter » (PDF) Download the full roundtable agenda » (PDF) In its sixth annual gathering, led by Kemal Derviş and co-chaired by Strobe Talbott and Richard C. Blum, the Brookings Blum Roundtable convened leaders from the climate change and global development communities from July 30 through August 1, 2009 to discuss and debate policy options to stimulate green, pro-poor growth. By examining the challenges and opportunities policymakers face, the roundtable forged sustainable solutions to solve the climate crisis in a way that revitalizes the global economy and lifts the lives of the poor. Lunch Briefing:  “Towards a Global Climate Agreement: Key Insights from Project Catalyst” Keynote Sessions: “A Blueprint for Transatlantic Climate Cooperation” “Compounding Crises: How Can and How Are the Poor Protecting Themselves?” “Greening Business: Engaging the Private Sector in Climate Change Solutions” Hal Harvey, ClimateWorks Foundation Thomas Heller, Stanford Law School Moderator: William Antholis, Brookings John Podesta, Center for American Progress Cem Özdemir, German Green Party Moderator: Timothy Wirth, United Nations Foundation Ernest Aryeetey, University of Ghana and Director, Africa Growth Initiative at Brookings Helen Clark, United Nations Development Program Raymond Offenheiser, Oxfam America Moderator: Karen Kornbluh, Center for American Progress Meg McDonald, Alcoa Foundation Jane Nelson, Harvard Kennedy School of Government Glenn Prickett, Conservation International Mark Tercek, the Nature Conservancy          [...]



2008 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Development in the Balance - How Will the World’s Poor Cope with Climate Change?

Fri, 01 Aug 2008 08:00:00 -0400

Event Information August 1-3, 2008 Global poverty and climate change are two of the most pressing challenges for global policymakers today, and require policy prescriptions that address their interrelated issues. Effective climate solutions must empower development by improving livelihoods, health and economic prospects while poverty alleviation must become a central strategy for both mitigating emissions and reducing the poor’s vulnerability to climate change. 2008 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Related Materials Read the roundtable report - Double Jeopardy: What the Climate Crisis Means for the Poor? »  Read the related book »  Download the participant list » (PDF) Download the scene setter » (PDF) Download the full roundtable agenda » (PDF) In its fifth annual gathering, led by Lael Brainard and co-chaired by Strobe Talbott and Richard C. Blum, the Brookings Blum Roundtable addressed the challenges of climate change and development and convened leaders from both the development and climate change communities from August 1-3, 2008, to discuss and debate policy ideas that could benefit both fronts. By examining common challenges—accountability, effective deployment of resources, agenda-setting, mobilizing the public and financial resources, and achieving scale and sustainability—the Roundtable established a solid foundation for collaboration among the climate change and development communities and fostered ideas for policy action. Keynote Sessions Keynote Panel: “Noble Nobels: Solutions to Save the Planet” Steven Chu, University of California, Berkeley Al Gore, Generation Investment Management; 45th Vice President of the United States Keynote Panel: Legal Empowerment of the Poor Mary Robinson, Realizing Rights: The Ethical Globalization Initiative Madeline Albright, The Albright Group; Former U.S. Secretary of State Keynote Panel: “How Do We Achieve Climate Justice?” Kumi Naidoo, CIVICUS and the Global Call to Action Against Poverty Mary Robinson, Realizing Rights: The Ethical Globalization Initiative          [...]



2007 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Development's Changing Face - New Players, Old Challenges, Fresh Opportunities

Wed, 01 Aug 2007 00:00:00 -0400

Event Information August 1-3, 2007 Register for the EventFrom a bureaucratic backwater in the waning days of the Cold War, the fight against global poverty has become one of the hottest tickets on the global agenda. The cozy, all-of-a-kind club of rich country officials who for decades dominated the development agenda has given way to a profusion of mega philanthropists, new bilaterals such as China, "celanthropists" and super-charged advocacy networks vying to solve the world's toughest problems. While philanthropic foundations and celebrity goodwill ambassadors have been part of the charitable landscape for many years, the explosion in the givers' wealth, the messaging leverage associated with new media and social networking, and the new flows of assistance from developing country donors and diasporas together herald a new era of global action on poverty. The new scale and dynamism of these entrants offer hopeful prospects for this continuing fight, even as the new entrants confront some of the same conundrums that official aid donors have grappled with in the past. On August 1-3, 2007, the Brookings Blum Roundtable gathered representatives reflective of this dynamic landscape to discuss these trends. Through robust discussion and continuing cross-sector partnerships, the conference hopes to foster lasting and widespread improvements in this new field of development. 2007 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Related Materials Read the roundtable report - Making Poverty History? How Activists, Philanthropists, and the Public Are Changing Global Development »  Download the participant list » (PDF)  Download the scene setter » (PDF)     2007 Brookings Blum Roundtable Agenda: Fighting Global Poverty: Who'll Be Relevant In 2020? Matthew Bishop, The Economist, "Fighting Global Poverty: Who'll Be Relevant In 2020?" Homi Kharas, The Brookings Institution, "The New Reality Of Aid" Jane Nelson, Harvard University, "New Development Players And Models" Angelina, Bono, And Me: New Vehicles To Engage The Public Darrell M. West, Brown University, "Angelina, Mia, And Bono: Celebrities And International Development" Joshua Busby, University of Texas, Austin, "Is There A Constituency For Global Poverty? Jubilee 2000 And The Future Of Development Advocacy" Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, The Brookings Institution, "Nigeria's Fight For Debt Relief: Tracing The Path" Leveraging Knowledge For Development Ashok Khosla, Development Alternatives Group, "Leveraging Knowledge To End Poverty" Eric Brewer, University of California, Berkeley, "Development And Engineering" Social Enterprise And Private Enterprise Chaired by: Mary Robinson, Realizing Rights: The Ethical Globalization Initiative J. Gregory Dees, Duke University, "Philanthropy And Enterprise: Harnessing The Power Of Business And Entrepreneurship For Social Change" Africa's Economic Successes: What's Worked And What's Next Moderated by: Paul Martin, former Prime Minister of Canada Panelists Donald Kaberuka, African Development Bank Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, The Brookings Institution Effecting Change Through Accountable Channels Jane Nelson, Harvard University, "Effecting Change Through Accountable Channels" Simon Zadek, AccountAbility, "Accountability Compacts: Collaborative Governance For The 21stCentury" Global Impact: Philanthropy Ch[...]



2006 Brookings Blum Roundtable: The Tangled Web - The Poverty-Insecurity Nexus

Wed, 02 Aug 2006 00:00:00 -0400

Event Information Register for the EventIn a world where borders matter less and where seemingly faraway threats can become immediate problems, the fight against poverty is no longer a matter of just doing the right thing – it is a matter of doing the smart thing to ensure security at home and abroad. As seen across the globe, by exhausting institutions, depleting resources, weakening leaders and crushing hope, extreme poverty fuels instability that often leads to armed conflict and can be a breeding ground for terrorists. The reverse is also true: insecurity stemming from conflict and demographic and environmental challenges makes it harder for leaders, institutions and other stakeholders to address poverty. Simply put, poverty is both a cause of insecurity and a product of it. To explore this tangled web, in August 2006 the Brookings Blum roundtable discussed the challenges and possible solutions with a diverse group of leaders, including policymakers, business executives and academics, and developed recommendations for change. 2006 Brookings Blum Roundtable: Related Materials Read the roundtable report - Ending Poverty, Promoting Peace: The Quest for Global Security »  View related conference book »  Download the participant list » (PDF)  Download the scene setter » (PDF)    2006 Brookings Blum Roundtable Agenda: Global Poverty, Conflict and Insecurity Susan Rice, The Brookings Institution, "Global Poverty, Weak States and Insecurity" Edward Miguel, University of California, Berkeley, "Global Poverty, Conflict and Insecurity" Operating in Insecure Environments Jane Nelson, Harvard University, "Operating in Insecure Environments" Keynote Address: "Achieving Peace in an Inequitable World" James D. Wolfensohn, Chairman of Citigroup International Advisory Board and Former President of the World Bank The Role of Leadership in Overcoming Poverty & Security in Africa Chaired by: Mary Robinson, Realizing Rights: The Ethical Globalization Initiative Robert Rotberg, Harvard University, "The Role of Leadership in Overcoming Poverty & Insecurity in Africa" Leadership Presentations: Mohammed Ibrahim, Chairman, Celtel International John Kachamila, Former Minister, Mozambique Ketumile Masire, Former President of Botswana Resource and Environmental Insecurity Colin Kahl, University of Minnesota, "Demography, Environment and Civil Strife" Anthony Nyong, University of Jos, Nigeria, "Resource and Environmental Security" Keynote Address Kemal Dervis, Administrator, United Nations Development Programme Youth and Conflict Henrik Urdal, The International Peace Research Institute, "The Demographics of Political Violence: Youth Bulges, Insecurity and Conflict" Marc Sommers, Tufts University, "Embracing The Margins: Working with Youth Amidst War and Insecurity" Jane Nelson, Harvard University, "Operating in Insecure Environments: The Youth Demographic" Transformational Diplomacy and the Route to Security Jennifer Windsor, Freedom House, "Breaking the Poverty-Insecurity Nexus: Is Democracy the Answer?" Presentations: Philip Zelikow, United States Department of State Madeleine Albright, 64th Secretary of State Mary K. Bush, Chairman, HELP Commission Lael Brainard, The Global Economy and Development Pr[...]



2005 Brookings Blum Roundtable: The Private Sector in the Fight Against Global Poverty

Wed, 03 Aug 2005 00:00:00 -0400

Event Information August 3-6, 2005 From August 3 to 6, 2005, fifty preeminent international leaders from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors came together at the Aspen Institute for a roundtable, "The Private Sector in the Fight against Global Poverty." The roundtable was hosted by Richard C. Blum of Blum Capital Partners and Strobe Talbott and Lael Brainard of the Brookings Institution, with the active support of honorary cochairs Walter Isaacson of the Aspen Institute and Mary Robinson of Realizing Rights: The Ethical Globalization Initiative. By highlighting the power of the market to help achieve social and economic progress in the world's poorest nations, the roundtable's organizers hoped to galvanize the private, public, and nonprofit sectors to move beyond argument and analysis to action. Put simply, as Brookings president Strobe Talbott explained, the roundtable's work was "brainstorming with a purpose." With experts hailing from around the world and representing diverse sectors and approaches, the dialogue was as multilayered as the challenge of poverty itself. Rather than summarize the conference proceedings, this essay weaves together the thoughtful observations, fresh insights, and innovative ideas that characterized the discussion. A companion volume, Transforming the Development Landscape: The Role of the Private Sector, contains papers by conference participants, providing in-depth analysis of each conference topic. View the 2005 report » (PDF) View the conference agenda » View the list participants »         [...]



2004 Brookings Blum Roundtable: America's Role in the Fight Against Global Poverty

Fri, 30 Jul 2004 00:00:00 -0400

Event Information July 30-31, 2004 On July 30-31, 2004, more than 40 preeminent international leaders from the public, private, and non-profit sectors came together at the Aspen Institute to discuss "America's Role in the Fight Against Global Poverty" and to set out a forward-looking strategy for the United States. Co-hosted by Richard C. Blum of Blum Capital Partners LP, the Brookings Institution's Poverty and Global Economy Initiative, the Aspen Institute, and Realizing Rights: The Ethical Globalization Initiative, the group's aim was to explore the dilemma of global poverty from different perspectives, to disaggregate the seemingly intractable problem into more manageable challenges, and to identify key elements of an effective U.S. policy agenda. With roundtable participants hailing from around the world and representing diverse experiences and approaches, the dialogue was as multifaceted as the challenge of poverty itself. Rather than simply summarize conference proceedings, this essay attempts to weave together the thoughtful exchanges, impassioned calls to action, fresh insights, and innovative ideas that characterized the discussion, and to set the stage for ongoing collaboration in the struggle for human dignity. Helping to define the issues, share and encourage what works, and build the intellectual framework for such an enterprise will be the guiding mission of the Richard C. Blum Roundtable in the years ahead. View the full report » View the conference agenda » View the participant list »         [...]